Trump chastises Jewish voters who didn't vote for him in 2020

Former president calls on religious groups to "get together" and unify around his agenda during campaign-style phone conference.

Dan Verbin, Canada ,

Donald Trump
Donald Trump
Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

During a campaign-style conference call on Thursday former President Donald Trump spoke about his disappointment that a significant majority of American Jews did not vote for him in the 2020 election.

"Look what I did with the embassy in Jerusalem and what I did with so many other things. Israel has never had a better friend, and yet I got 25% of the [Jewish] vote," he said, according to Business Insider.

"I think they have to get together. There has to be a little bit more unity with the religious groups all represented on this call," said Trump during the talk, which was organized by the religious group Intercessors for America.

The call included the leaders of multiple Jewish and Christian religious organizations.

Trump said that he had worked hard during his administration to preserve religious rights. He compared his record to that of President Joe Biden and the Democrats – whose stance on religion Republicans have termed an "anti-faith agenda” – describing it a “very, very sad thing for our country.”

"I don't think anyone has done anywhere near as much for our religion and for religion generally than we have in the past four years,” Trump said.

Later in the call, he commented: "One of my greatest honors was fighting for religious liberty and for defending the Judeo-Christian values and principles of our nation's founding."

During the call, Trump also wondered why only half of Catholic voters supported him in the election, given the “situation with abortion” with the Democrats.

"I did a lot for the Catholics. And I don't know, you know, I'm a little bit surprised that we didn't do better with the Catholic vote," Trump said. “I think we got about 50% of the vote. And yet, we did a lot for the Catholic vote. So we'll have to talk to them. We're gonna have to meet with the Catholics."

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Rosh Hashanah in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)



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