Republican lawmaker under fire for anti-Semitic conspiracy theories

Jewish groups blast freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene for embracing anti-Semitic conspiracy theories on social media.

Arutz Sheva North America Staff ,

Republican Party
Republican Party
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Jewish groups on Friday criticized freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) after it came to light that she had embraced anti-Semitic conspiracy theories on social media.

In a Facebook post in 2018, Greene implicated “Rothschild Inc” in connection with a deadly forest fire that, she wrote, was started using laser beams from space.

The Republican Jewish Coalition said her comments were “indefensible and unacceptable.”

“We rightly opposed Marjorie Taylor Greene in her primary election for Congress and proudly supported her GOP opponent, Dr. John Cowan,” RJC director Matt Brooks said.

The Conference of Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations similarly denounced Greene, saying, “It is unacceptable for Members of Congress to spread baseless hate against the Jewish people.”

“We are outraged by the statements, past and present, of Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene. She routinely traffics in unfounded conspiracy theories that are often antisemitic in nature. As an avid supporter of QAnon, Representative Greene espouses anti-Semitic canards, such as placing blame on ‘the Rothschilds’ for recent wildfires in California and declaring that ‘Zionist supremacists’ are behind supposed nefarious plots.”

“There must be a swift and commensurate response from Congressional leadership making clear that this conduct cannot and will not be allowed to debase our politics.”

Greene recently filed articles of impeachment against President Joe Biden, accusing Biden of "enabling bribery" and "blatant nepotism" by utilizing his son Hunter Biden’s position on the Ukrainian energy company Burisma.

Greene’s Twitter account was temporarily suspended recently. This occurred hours after she posted a clip from an interview with a local news outlet in which she condemned Georgia election officials and expressed support for theories claiming that voting machines, absentee ballots and other issues led to widespread fraud in the state during the presidential election.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)



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