Transgender
Transgender iStock

A new survey by the Pew Research Center has found that 60% of adult Americans believe that gender is determined by sex at birth - up from 56% in 2021 and 54% in 2017.

Although about 80% of adult Americans believe that there is some discrimination against transgenders, and a majority favor laws which would protect transgender individuals from discrimination in public spaces, housing, and jobs, 58% still support requiring transgender athletes to compete on teams that match their birth sex. In addition, 46% of Americans would like it to be illegal for health professionals to help minors with gender transition.

A smaller minority, 41%, would like to see transgenders use the bathrooms which match the genders they were assigned at birth, and an equal number support legislation to ban teaching gender identity in public elementary schools.

Thirty-seven percent of Americans support investigating parents for child abuse if they help minor children transition, and just 27% believe that medical care for gender transitions should be covered by insurance.

Less than half of Americans (47%) believe it is "extremely" or "very" important to use a transgender individual's new name after they transition, and just over one-third (34%) say the same about using a transgender's preferred pronouns (he/she/they).

Less than half (44%) of US adults believes that forms and online profiles should include options other than "male" and "female," and just 38% say that government documents such as passports and drivers licenses should include nonbinary options.

Nearly one-in-four (38%) American adults believe that society has gone too far in its acceptance of transgenders.

Meanwhile, among parents of elementary school children, 45% say it is good that their children did not learn about transgenderism and nonbinary people in school or that their children did learn about it and that that is a bad thing. Just 13% say it is a bad thing that their children did not learn about transgenderism and nonbinary people, or a good thing that their children did learn about it.

Percentages are similar for parents of middle and high school students, 34% of whom say it is good their children did not learn about these issues, or bad that their children did; just 14% say it is good that their children did learn about it, or bad that their children did not.

The percentage of neutral parents rose from 41% among elementary school parents to 51% among middle and high school parents.