Trump seeks to join Texas bid to invalidate millions of votes

Trump asks to intervene in Texas' lawsuit which seeks to invalidate millions of votes in four battleground states.

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

US President Donald Trump
US President Donald Trump
Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead

US President Donald Trump on Wednesday asked the Supreme Court to block millions of votes from four battleground states that voted for President-elect Joe Biden.

Trump's request came in a filing with the court asking to intervene in a lawsuit brought on Tuesday by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton and which seeks to invalidate millions of votes cast in four states that went for Biden: Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

Trump, acting “in his personal capacity” as a presidential candidate, seeks to intervene in order “to protect his unique and substantial personal interests as a candidate for re-election,” says the 39-page court filing quoted by CNBC.

Trump’s attorney, John Eastman, wrote in the motion that “President Trump seeks to have the votes cast in the Defendant States unlawfully for his opponent to be deemed invalid.”

The extraordinary lawsuit, announced on Tuesday by the Republican Attorney General of Texas, Ken Paxton, was filed directly with the Supreme Court, as is permitted for certain litigation between states.

Texas argues that electors from Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin should not be allowed to cast their votes in part because those states unconstitutionally changed their voting procedures during the coronavirus pandemic to allow for increased mail-in ballots.

Paxton alleges that the new voting processes in the battleground states skewed the presidential election results and asked the Supreme Court to delay Monday's deadline for the Electoral College to make Biden's victory official.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court rejected an effort by Republicans to reverse Biden’s victory in the state of Pennsylvania.

The court rejected a petition from Trump ally Rep. Mike Kelly, a Pennsylvania Republican, who argued that virtually all of the state’s mail-in ballots were unlawful, according to CNBC.

The decision was announced in an order with no noted dissents.



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