Channel 13 News legal correspondent Baruch Kra was attacked on Tuesday near the Jerusalem District Court, where he was covering a hearing in former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s trial.

A woman holding a cane approached Kra during a demonstration outside the courthouse and threw his kippah off his head.

"I do not know the woman who hit me in the head with a cane and threw off my kippah," Kra wrote on Twitter, adding, "I also do not intend to file a complaint against her. I am saddened, however, about the damage and violence that an uninhibited system of instigation has brought upon us. And also, for those who threw the kippah off my head, and shouted: ‘Take off the kippah’, let me tell you it is here to stay, precisely because it represents something so far away from you."

"I do not know the woman who hit me in the head with a stick and threw off my kippah," Kra wrote on Twitter, adding, "I also do not intend to file a complaint against her. I am saddened, however, about the damage and violence that an uninhibited system of instigation has brought upon us. And also, for those who threw the kippah off my head, and shouted: ‘Take off the kippah’, let me tell you it is here to stay, precisely because it represents something so far removed from you."

Channel 13 News said in response, "We strongly condemn the manifestations of physical and verbal violence against Channel 13 News’ journalists. Journalists should be free to do their job anywhere without feeling threatened. The company’s journalists will continue to do their job with dedication and professionalism."

The incident was also denounced by Communications Minister Yoaz Hendel and Public Security Minister Omer Bar-Lev, who both agreed that "the press is the lifeblood of democracy and today’s incident is a crossing of a red line."

Bar-Lev said, "We will not tolerate an attack on journalists or any other media official. The pictures we saw today are a complete disgrace and we cannot ignore them."

Hendel added, "Violence against journalists who do their job is dangerous. Violence in general is unacceptable and particularly violence against journalists cannot become a matter of routine. Whether there is a complaint or not, the police must show determination to convey the message and make sure this does not happen again."

"Journalists in Israel should work without fear. This is how I behaved in the past, in the case of an attack on journalist Avishai Ben-Haim and in other cases, and this is how we will act today," Hendel said.