US President Donald Trump
US President Donald Trump White House

One hundred years to the day after the ratification of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right to vote in the United States of America, U.S. President Donald Trump has announced that he intends to grant a posthumous pardon to one of the most prominent figures in the women’s suffrage movement.

Fox News reports that Susan B. Anthony will be the beneficiary of this presidential pardon; Anthony died in 1906 and did not merit to see the fruits of her efforts.

She was arrested in 1872 for attempting to vote illegally; at her trial she was found guilty and ordered to pay a fine of $100 plus court costs. Even then, the NewYorker came out in her favor, calling the trial “the greatest outrage history has ever recorded.” However, Anthony did not find favor in the eyes of the U.S. administration, with then-President Ulysses S. Grant telling her that he had “already done more for women than any other president” – and he refused to pardon her.

In 1919, thirteen years after Anthony’s death, Congress finally granted women the right to vote, and it was ratified a year later. Then, in 1921, the National Woman’s Party gifted the U.S. Capitol with a special monument honoring three prominent women who had fought for women’s suffrage – Susan B. Anthony alongside Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Speaking to reporters on Tuesday, President Trump told them, “Did you know … [that] she was never pardoned? What took so long? She was guilty for voting, and we’re going to be signing a full and complete pardon [for someone…] very, very important.”

One hundred years to the day after the ratification of the 19th Amendment that granted women the right to vote in the United States of America, U.S. President Donald Trump has announced that he intends to grant a posthumous pardon to one of the most prominent figures in the women’s suffrage movement.

Fox News reports that Susan B. Anthony will be the beneficiary of this presidential pardon; Anthony died in 1906 and did not merit to see the fruits of her efforts.

She was arrested in 1872 for attempting to vote illegally; at her trial she was found guilty and ordered to pay a fine of $100 plus court costs. Even then, the NewYorker came out in her favor, calling the trial “the greatest outrage history has ever recorded.” However, Anthony did not find favor in the eyes of the U.S. administration, with then-President Ulysses S. Grant telling her that he had “already done more for women than any other president” – and he refused to pardon her.

In 1919, thirteen years after Anthony’s death, Congress finally granted women the right to vote, and it was ratified a year later. Then, in 1921, the National Woman’s Party gifted the U.S. Capitol with a special monument honoring three prominent women who had fought for women’s suffrage – Susan B. Anthony alongside Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Speaking to reporters on Tuesday, President Trump told them, “Did you know … [that] she was never pardoned? What took so long? She was guilty for voting, and we’re going to be signing a full and complete pardon [for someone…] very, very important.”

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