Documents show massive network of Iranian spies infiltrated Europe

Spy network in 22 European cities planned terrorist attacks using explosives, acid and toxic chemicals, newly obtained documents reveal.

Tags: Iran Spies EU
Dan Verbin ,

Spying
Spying
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A massive network of Iranian spies is operating inside Europe, stretching through 22 cities across the continent.

The network’s plans for terrorist attacks using explosives, acid and toxic chemicals were detailed in documents discovered by German police and obtained by the Jewish Chronicle.

The documents were found in a rental car being used for intelligence purposes by Iranian spy chief Assadollah Assadi, who was sentenced by an Antwerp, Belgium court in February to 20 years in prison for his role in a failed 2018 bomb attack in Paris, the Jewish Chronicle reported.

The papers found inside Assadi’s red Ford S-Max detailed a “sophisticated network of regime agents” who have infiltrated across European cities. There were also hand-written bomb-making instructions and a 200-page green notebook with entries on trips made over four years to 289 European locations to meet spies. Six cellphones, a laptop, external hard drives and USB sticks with intelligence training manuals on them were also recovered. There was also 30,000 Euros in cash.

The instructions for explosive making dealt with arming a bomb codenamed PlayStation, which had a specially positioned antenna that would avoid extraneous Wi-Fi signals. The explosive device eventually made its way to a 2018 anti-regime rally full of thousands of Iranian dissidents and politicians such as former New York City mayor and Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

The terror plot was foiled the day of the attack when Belgian police arrested the would be bombers, two agents being run by Assadi.

When the PlayStation bomb was later detonated by Belgium’s bomb disposal unit, the explosion was so strong that it destroyed the robot and injured a nearby officer.

Assadi was arrested a day later in the Ford rental car in Germany.

The disclosure comes at a sensitive time as Western powers begin meeting with Tehran in Vienna to look for ways to restore the 2015 nuclear deal that former President Donald Trump withdrew from.

At the time, Trump called the Obama-era pact a “horrible, one-sided deal."



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