Women's role in Abraham Accords celebrated on International Women’s Day

Women in diplomacy: Israel’s Ambassador to the United States and the United Nations Gilad Erdan along with Embassies of Morocco, United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, co-host event highlighting women’s role in the Abraham Accords

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

Celebrating women in diplomacy
Celebrating women in diplomacy
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In honor of International Women’s Day, the Embassy of Israel to the United States co-hosted an event with the embassies of Morocco, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain on Monday discussing the essential role women are playing in the peace agreements known as the Abraham Accords.

“International Women’s Day is not just a day for celebrating, it is also a day for reflecting on the role women play in our societies,” said Israel’s Ambassador to the United States and the United Nations Gilad Erdan in opening remarks. “As we gather in this forum to discuss the topic of women in diplomacy, this is the perfect opportunity to highlight the essential part women must play in promoting peace and growing people-to-people interactions in our region.”

Moderated by Lynn Roche, Press and Public Diplomacy Director, Near Eastern Affairs Bureau, US Department of State, the events distinguished speakers featured:
- Keynote speech by Her Highness Lalla Joumala, Moroccan Ambassador to the United States
- Shaima Gargash, Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the United Arab Emirates to the United States
- Yousif Ahmed, Acting Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of The Kingdom of Bahrain to the United States
- Rose Sager, Trade Representative, Embassy of The Kingdom of Bahrain to the United States
- Tammy Ben Haim, Minister for Public Diplomacy, Embassy of Israel to the United States

Ambassador Erdan told the forum: “The Accords have transformed the region in so many ways. They are the source for new cooperation in business, culture and academia and are a shining example of coexistence and religious tolerance.”
“This new inspiring peace has also highlighted the essential role of women in both achieving peace and actualizing it. The involvement of women in forging these agreements and in building new partnerships between our governments and perhaps even more importantly, between our people, is instrumental to their success,” he said.

Her Highness Lalla Joumala, Ambassador of Morocco to the United States said in the event: “I am honored to join you for what is a ‘bitter-sweet’ occasion in our calendars. On the positive side International Women’s Day is an opportunity to celebrate the advances in women’s rights and thankfully there are many. However, it also highlights the persistent challenges we continue to face around the world in achieving gender-parity. This past year in particular, the effect of the devastating pandemic has further exacerbated the disparities among marginalized groups within all our societies, including women. Thankfully 2020 also ended in a note of great hope especially in our region. With the respected diplomatic breakthroughs between Bahrain, Sudan, the UAE, Morocco, and the state of Israel.”

Shaima Gargash Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of the United Arab Emirates to the United States said: “Having this platform on International Women’s Day means so much because this is something our children like my daughters can look up to moving forward. The Abraham Accords are such a historic moment for our region and for peacemaking. There is no way to promote this peace without women.”

Yousif Ahmed, Acting Deputy Chief of Mission, Embassy of Bahrain to the United States said in relation to women’s leadership in the fight against COVID: “Women are actually leading the health response for the COVID vaccine. Women also make up almost 70 percent of the healthcare workforce. I think that's something quite significant. The core work behind the vaccine research also came from a team of women, and that's something that can’t be disputed”.

Rose Sager, Trade Representative of Bahrain in the United States, on growing up Jewish in a Muslim country while attending Catholic and Government Schools, said she believes she’s a model of diversity and inclusion: “Growing up in Bahrain, a model of peaceful coexistence and religious freedoms, being a female was never an obstacle. On the contrary, we all were encouraged to do whatever we aspired to.”



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