Listen: Trump recorded demanding that Georgia Secretary of State “recalculates” the vote

Trump: "There's no way I lost Georgia!" S. of State: "Mr. President, your data are wrong."

Arutz Sheva Staff ,

President Donald Trump
President Donald Trump
Reuters

With time running out, President Donald Trump appears to be resorting to more desperate means to try to overturn the results of the 2020 US Presidential Election. A recording obtained by the Washington Post shows Trump pressuring Georgia's Secretary of State to “recalculate” the vote count in his state, because, as he says, “I just want to find 11,780 votes.”

During the phone call, made on Saturday, Trump tells Brad Raffensperger that, “There’s no way I lost Georgia. There’s no way! We won by hundreds of thousands of votes,” to which Raffensperger responds, “Well, Mr. President, the challenge that you have is, that the data you have is wrong.”

"There's nothing wrong with saying, you know, that you've recalculated," Trump continues. "You should want to have an accurate election - and you're a Republican."

"We believe we do have an accurate election." Raffensperger is heard replying.

"No you don't. You don't have. Not even close. You're off by hundreds of thousands of votes," Trump fires back.

President Trump spoke with state officials from a number of battleground states Saturday in a conference call, urging them to consider joining efforts by Republican lawmakers to challenge the electoral vote count.

Trump made no secret of the phone call, tweeting Sunday that, “I spoke to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger yesterday about Fulton County and voter fraud in Georgia. He was unwilling, or unable, to answer questions such as the ‘ballots under table’ scam, ballot destruction, out of state ‘voters,’ dead voters, and more. He has no clue!”

The President later called election officials and reiterated claims that he had won the state of Georgia. He also threatened Raffensperger and his staff with “legal consequences” if they failed to cooperate.

Raffensperger is a Republican who has not been afraid to admit that he voted for Trump. His office investigated claims of fraud in the November election, but concluded there was no substantial evidence of widespread malpractice. Other, independent investigations have come to similar conclusions, with some organizations having looked into specific allegations made by Trump of “dead voters” and discovering that the people concerned were, after all, alive.



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