Norway: Suspect in 1982 Paris attack loses extradition appeal

Norway court rules that legal conditions for extraditing suspect in 1982 attack in Jewish quarter in Paris have been met.

Elad Benari, Canada ,

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The legal conditions for extraditing a suspect linked to a 1982 attack in France, in which six people were killed, have been met, a Norway appellate court found Friday, according to AFP.

Walid Abdulrahman Abu Zayed, a 61-year-old Palestinian Arab who became a Norwegian citizen in 1997, is wanted by French authorities on suspicion of being one of the shooters in the attack on the Jo Goldenberg restaurant in Paris' Marais district, a historically Jewish quarter.

The attack on August 9, 1982, which left six people dead and 22 injured, was blamed on the Abu Nidal Organization, a splinter group of Fatah.

Abu Zayed, who has lived in Norway since 1991, has maintained his innocence.

Last week a Norwegian district court found that an extradition was possible under Norwegian law.

The appellate court's ruling to uphold that decision can be appealed to the Norwegian Supreme Court, and the government makes the ultimate decision on whether to extradite him to France, after the judicial process has been completed.

Abu Zayed was remanded in custody by an Oslo court after he was arrested last month following a French extradition request.

France had requested Abu Zayed's extradition before, but Norway has had a policy of not extraditing its nationals.

However, a recently implemented deal between the European Union, Norway and Iceland has paved the way for extradition.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Sukkot in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)



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