New UN resolution would condemn Israeli annexation

Draft Security Council resolution seeks to rebuke Trump peace plan by condemning Israeli plan to annex communities in Judea and Samaria.

Elad Benari ,

UN Security Council
UN Security Council
Reuters

A draft United Nations Security Council resolution circulated on Tuesday condemned an Israeli plan to annex communities in Judea and Samaria, Reuters reports, in what is seen as a rebuke of US President Donald Trump’s peace plan.

The draft text, circulated to council members by Tunisia and Indonesia, would seemingly face a US veto.

Diplomats quoted by Reuters said negotiations on the text would likely begin later this week. Palestinian Authority (PA) chairman Mahmoud Abbas is expected to speak to the council next week about the plan, possibly coinciding with a vote on the draft resolution.

The discussion is also expected to include Israel's ambassador to the United Nations, Danny Danon, and other members of the council.

Trump’s senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner, who was a member of the team which authored the peace plan, is set to brief Security Council members on the plan in a closed-door meeting on Thursday.

The resolution circulated on Tuesday “stresses the illegality of the annexation of any part” of “occupied Palestinian territories” and “condemns recent statements calling for annexation by Israel” of these territories, according to the draft seen by Reuters.

The resolution stresses the need for an acceleration of international and regional efforts to launch “credible negotiations on all final status issues in the Middle East peace process without exception.”

Reports on the draft were published hours after UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres emphasized the UN's role as “the guardian of international law in the Arab-Israeli conflict”.

"Our position is very clear. We are the guardians of the UN resolutions and international law in relation to the Palestinian question," Guterres told a wide-ranging news conference at the UN headquarters.

"We are totally committed to the two-state solution," he added, reiterating his stance that the peace plan must be based on the pre-1967 borders.




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