Russia welcomes Afrikaners:
15,000 Boers plan move to Russia from South Africa

Absorption considered after series of murders South African government accused of encouraging.

Mordechai Sones,

Funeral of Afrikaner Resistance Movement (AWB) leader Eugene Terre'blanche
Funeral of Afrikaner Resistance Movement (AWB) leader Eugene Terre'blanche
Reuters

As the death toll rises monthly among South Africa's Afrikaners – often horribly slaughtered and mutilated in hate-crimes – 15,000 of them are considering mass migration to Russia.

Russia's humanitarian absorption of migrant refugees is being weighed after a series of murders the South African government has been accused of encouraging, and that have made farming in South Africa the most deadly occupation in the world.

South African farm killings, where victims are typically members of the country’s white, Afrikaans-speaking minority, are often extremely brutal in nature, involving prolonged periods of torture.

The murders are little-reported even within South Africa itself — the government directed police to stop releasing information about victims’ ethnicity in 2007. "Often, they only count the farmer and not his wife and children that were also attacked or murdered,” South African missionary Charl Van Wyk told World Net Daily in an interview.

According to Breitbart, 1,187 farmers, 490 family members, 147 farm employees, and 24 farm visitors are known to have been murdered between 1998 and the end of 2016 — although the true figure is estimated at between 3,000 and 4,000.

White South Africans fear the killings have the tacit support of the ruling African National Congress, with President Jacob Zuma defending the singing of the revolutionary song Kill the Farmer, Kill the Boer, and one his MPs crying out “Bury them alive!” during a parliamentary debate.

“These songs cannot be regarded as hate speech or unconstitutional,” ANC Secretary General Gwede Mantashe said in response to subsequent outrage. “Any judgment that describes them as such is impractical and unimplementable.”

South Africa
iStock







top