'I don't understand what a freeze is'

Supreme Court attacks government freeze of Western Wall plan. Petitioners say they are ready to drop petition and return to plan.

Shlomo Pyutrikovsky,

Women of the Wall (File)
Women of the Wall (File)
Flash90

Supreme Court Justices Miriam Naor, Hanan Meltzer and Yoram Danziger discussed the petitions filed by Women of the Wall and the Reform and Conservative movements against the government's decision to freeze the Western Wall plan.

The judges asked the petitioners at the beginning of the hearing whether they would be prepared to return to the government’s compromise plan, if the government also agreed.

The question was raised following the position of the Reform and Conservative movements recently submitted to the Supreme Court, according to which, since the government withdrew from the Western Wall plan, they were returning to their demand for a place and status in the existing Western Wall plaza.

The petitioners responded in the affirmative and noted that if the government cancels the freeze on the Western Wall plan and begins to implement it, they are willing to withdraw their petition.

During the discussion Naor criticized the government's decision to freeze the plan. "I do not understand what a freeze is. I do not recognize such a concept."

Naor also turned to a representative of the State Prosecutor's Office and asked, "Is it not proper to reconsider the freeze on the Western Wall plan?”

The judge added, "If the state does not rescind the freeze, the government will have to answer us whether in its opinion the Supreme Court has the authority to impose the outline."

The LIBA organization said after the hearing, "The conduct of the Supreme Court justices headed by President Naor is bordering on disgrace” noting that the court was merely promoting a personal agenda by “imposing on the government the Western Wall plan that was frozen by it according to its authority. The ability to stop the Reform lies only in changing the regulations that are under the authority of the Minister of Religious Affairs, in legislation or in clarifying the regulations. "




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