'The woman who tamed Trump'

The Donald's brilliant advisor Kellyanne Conway is credited with making him stop firing from the hip. Will he remember that at the debates?

Guy Cohen ,

Kelly-Anne Conway
Kelly-Anne Conway
Photo: Reuters

Professional pollster Kellyanne Conway, 49, was brought in to manage Donald Trump's presidential campaign in August, after the Republican nominee took a severe dive in the polls following some counter-productive statements.

He's been recovering in the polls ever since, and the brilliant Conway has become a superstar in the American media, being interviewed left and right on all the top political talking-head shows.

Over the weekend, she appeared on the popular HBO show Realtime with Bill Maher. Her reception was very complimentary, despite the fact that Maher is considered a staunch liberal (though he's shown the willingness to break with the party line in the past).

"You're perhaps the most important person in the world because you seem to be the only person who's been able to tame Donald Trump," Maher told Conway. "Many have tried, but only you've been able to pull that sword out of the stone."

Conway is President and CEO of The Polling Company / WomanTrend, and she's considered an expert on the female vote. Trump drafted her into his campaign after he understood that Hillary Clinton's base of power is her extraordinary support among women, and that if he can't weaken the democratic candidate's hold on the female vote, his chances of victory are slim indeed, especially as women make up the majority of voters in the US.

Conway said in an interview with Fox News on Tuesday that Trump is very diligently preparing for his first debate with Clinton, set for next Monday. There is a great deal of media pressure on Matt Lauer, the journalist who moderated a recent quasi-debate between Trump and Clinton. This is because the US media decided that Lauer was too tough on Clinton, making her look bad. Conway claims that the media is doing this in order to put further pressure on the moderators of the future debates to tilt the proceedings in Clinton's favor.

A CNN poll from two weeks ago showed that Clinton still enjoys more supports among women, with a gap of 53% to 38%, while men overwhelmingly support Trump, 54%-32%.

A more interesting and nuanced piece of data to come out of the poll, however, is that there is a significant split between married and unmarried women. A staggering 73% of unmarried women prefer Clinton, while that number plummets to 36% among married women. There is no such gap between married and unmarried men.



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