Poll: Most Israelis against unity government

Two separate studies show huge opposition to Likud-Zionist Union coalition; support for Jewish Home, Yesh Atid at 2013 levels.

Tova Dvorin,

Netanyahu and Herzog
Netanyahu and Herzog
Yonatan Sindel/Flash 90

Most Israelis are staunchly against a Likud-Zionist Union unity government, two separate polls on major Israeli networks revealed Monday - and if Knesset elections were held today, both parties would face huge losses. 

The first poll, a Channel 2 poll by the Midgam/iPanels institute, indicates 52% opposition to the unity pact, with just 24% supporting. A majority (60%) of Zionist Union voters themselves oppose the unity government, with just 36 supporting. 

If elections were held in May 2016, according to this study, Likud would lose three seats to 27 total; Yesh Atid, would gain 7 to 18 total; Zionist Union would lose 7 seats, ergo 17 total; the Joint List would remain the same at 13 seats; Kulanu would lose three seats, or 7 total; Jewish Home would gain 2 seats to make 10; Yisrael Beytenu would regain three seats, or 9 total; and United Torah Judaism would gain one of Shas's seats, leaving them at 7 and 6, respectively. Meretz would also gain one seat, or 6 total. 

The second poll, a Channel 10 poll, shows far more dramatic results.

In this poll, Likud drops 5 seats to 25; Yesh Atid gains 9 seats to 20; the Zionist Union is nearly halved, to just 13 seats; the Joint List gains one seat to 14; Jewish Home regains 4 seats, to 12; Yisrael Beytenu gains three seats, to 9 total; Kulanu loses just one seat, to 9; and Meretz picks up one seat while Shas falls by one, leaving them at 6 and 6 a piece. United Torah Judaism would remain stable at 6 seats. 

50% of respondents in this study say they are against Zionist Union joining the government; 26% support the move; and 24% don't know.

Both studies remarkably reflect a change back to 33rd government of Israel distribution - with a greater balance between smaller and larger parties and Jewish Home and Yesh Atid both back to 2013 elections levels. 




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