'High Court Destroys Amona, Not Terrorist Home'

MK Struk condemns High Court rejecting demolition for terrorist who tried to murder Yehuda Glick, after ordering Amona destruction.

Benny Toker, Ari Yashar,

Evacuation and demolition in Amona (file)
Evacuation and demolition in Amona (file)
Nati Shohat/Flash 90.

The decision by the High Court to suspend the demolition order on the home of the Arab terrorist who tried to murder Temple Mount activist Yehuda Glick has MK Orit Struk (Jewish Home) livid, particularly when she compares it to the recent High Court order to destroy the Samaria town of Amona within two years.

Speaking to Arutz Sheva, Struk said "because the devoted doctors succeeded in saving Yehuda Glick's life, that's a reason for the home of the terrorist who planned to kill him to be saved? The reasoning of the judges escapes me."

"We've gone through a very cruel wave of terror and the decision to destroy the homes of terrorists is a part of stopping the wave of terror, and it has contributed to that," added Struk.

Moving on to discuss Amona, which the High Court ruled against last week despite the total absence of evidence behind Arab land claims against the town, and the legal purchase of large parts of the community, Struk expressed her shock that the court so easily would agree to destroy an entire flourishing community.

"It was possible to solve this issue without demolitions," she said. "The High Court chose not to find a solution but rather destroy, and on the other hand yesterday they decided to take pity on the home of a cruel terrorist who came to the heart of Jerusalem to murder Glick."

Struk along with MK Ayelet Shaked (Jewish Home) plans to meet with Amona residents and try to work out what steps can be taken to help the community.

Mu'taz Hijazi, the Islamic Jihad terrorist who shot Glick four times from point blank range outside the Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem where he worked at a restaurant roughly two months ago, was killed in a shootout with police.

Glick was critically wounded in the attack, but following a series of surgeries that had part of his lungs and intestines removed he made a miraculous recovery.

The panel of three Supreme Court judges apparently made their decision to postpone the demolition of Hijazi's home because Glick recovered, and because Hijazi's family claimed they didn't know he planned to attack.




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