Anti-Semitic Thug Ordered to Attend Shabbat Meal

Australian youth who took part in shocking anti-Semitic attack aboard a school bus also ordered to visit Jewish museum.

Ari Soffer ,

The shocking attack took place aboard a school bus
The shocking attack took place aboard a school bus
Thinkstock

An Australian teenager who took part in a shocking anti-Semitic attack on a school bus has been told by a court to attend a Shabbat dinner and visit Sydney's Jewish Museum, according to The Sydney Morning Herald.

The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was among a group of drunken youths who barged onto a Jewish school bus in Bondi back in August. The six attackers shouted anti-Semitic slogans including "Heil Hitler" and "Palestine must kill you Jews", and also threatened to "cut the throats" of the schoolchildren, who were all between 5 and 12 years old.

The convicted youth will also have to enroll in a "school harmony project" run by the New South Wales Jewish Board of Deputies, which represents the local Jewish community.

He was also recommended to read books from Holocaust survivors, including Primo Levi's If This Is A Man and Elie Wiesel's Night.

The relatively light sentence was apparently agreed by "both sides" at a "youth justice conference", during which the perpetrator was faced by one of the young victims and her family. 

Five other people involved in the attack received police cautions.

The justice conference was attended by a police youth liaison officer, a social worker, the parents of the offender, a convener, and Vic Alhadeff, chief executive of the NSW Jewish Board of Deputies, according to the Herald.

"The conference provided a measure of closure to the young girl who was present," said Alhadeff, who called it "a constructive system which provides a measure of restorative justice and closure, while offering a positive way forward."

"It gave her an opportunity to question the offender, to hear from him and to hear him express remorse for his actions," he said of the victim. "At the same time, he could hear directly from some of those affected as to the impact of his actions."



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