Debut of Islamic State's First Feature Length Film

55-minute movie has terror group threatening 'direct confrontation' with US, shows Syrian soldiers digging their own graves.

Ari Yashar ,

Flames of War trailer
Flames of War trailer
Screenshot

After releasing its Hollywood-style trailer last Tuesday night, the brutal Islamic State's (ISIS) Al Hayat Media Center on Friday came out with a 55-minute feature length film entitled "Flames of War: Fighting Has Just Begun."

The film, shot in a documentary-style, warns of an imminent direct conflict against America, and is narrated by a man with an accent suggesting American or Canadian roots, reports the International Business Times.

"A proxy war won't help you in Sham (Syria) just as it didn't help you in Iraq," the video concludes. "As for the near future, you will be forced into a direct confrontation."

The message refers to US President Barack Obama's insistence that he will not send US ground forces back into Iraq or into Syria to confront the rising ISIS threat, instead arming Syrian rebels to fight ISIS "by proxy" and conducting airstrikes.

The new video shows a high level of quality in terms of the filming and cinematic techniques, including portions filmed in night-vision. It features various depictions of ISIS terrorists seizing cities throughout Iraq and Syria.

In the last five minutes, the film shows Syrian army forces captured by ISIS as it seized the 17th Division air force base in Raqqa being forced to dig their own graves and warning Syrian families on camera to remove their children from the Syrian army before being murdered.

ISIS's new movie also features part of former US President George W. Bush's speeches, including one after bombings in Iraq in which he said "the United States and our allies have prevailed." The narrator then claims "hey lied, the flames were just beginning to intensify."

Social media and the internet, such as the recently posted film, have been used widely in ISIS's unprecedented campaign to intimidate the West and stir up new recruits from western countries.

Just last Thursday the group released a video of British journalist John Cantlie asking the UK to negotiate his release, in what apparently will be part of a series of videos in which the group intends to use the captive Englishman as a propaganda mouthpiece.

ISIS has already released videos of its brutal beheadings of US journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff, as well as UK aid worker David Haines.



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