'Trump was right on anti-Semitic threats'

White House says Trump was right not to jump to conclusions about anti-Semitic threats to JCCs.

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Arutz Sheva Staff,

Sean Spicer
Sean Spicer
Reuters

The White House said on Monday that President Donald Trump had been right not to jump to conclusions about anti-Semitic threats to Jewish community centers around the country.

The comments from White House spokesman Sean Spicer came following the arrest last week of a 19-year-old Israeli-American in connection with making over 100 bomb threats against U.S. Jewish sites.

“We saw these threats coming into Jewish community centers, and there was an immediate jump to criticize folks on the right, and to denounce people on the right and ask them to condemn them, and it turns out that in fact it wasn’t someone on the right,” Spicer said at a media briefing, according to JTA.

“The president from the get-go had said ‘I bet you it’s not someone [on the right]’ and he was right,” noted Spicer, who added that “people on the left” who had blamed the right for the threats had not been held accountable.

“In that particular case, we saw that the president was right and that this rush to judgment by a lot of folks on the left was wrong, and none of them have been held to account on that,” he continued.

The 19-year-old arrested last week, Michael Kaydar, reportedly used advanced technology and voice-altering equipment to call in the threats to more than 100 JCCs, Jewish day schools and other Jewish institutions in the United States in recent months.

While many Jewish groups had blamed white supremacists for the bomb threats, Trump refused to point any fingers. In February he reportedly said that the threats against Jewish communal institutions may be a false flag “to make others look bad.”

Trump’s opponents also criticized him for failing to condemn the bomb threats and other anti-Semitic incidents, though Spicer told reporters earlier this month that the president is "deeply disappointed and concerned" by the incidents.

Trump’s opponents also criticized him for failing to condemn the bomb threats and other anti-Semitic incidents, though Spicer told reporters earlier this month that the president is "deeply disappointed and concerned" by the incidents.

Trump also began his address to a joint session of Congress earlier this month by unequivocally stating that “we are a country that stands united in condemning hate and evil in all its forms.”








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