Kulanu MK: No one will preach to us

MK Roy Folkman explains why he changed his mind and is now willing to sit in a coalition with a PM possibly facing an indictment.

Chaim Lev,

Roy Folkman
Roy Folkman
Yossi Aloni

MK Roy Folkman (Kulanu) explained on Thursday why he changed his mind and is now willing to sit in a coalition with Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu even as he is facing an indictment.

“Neither I nor my party should receive any preaching from anyone today. For four years we showed time and time again how we prevented personal laws, how we stood by the gatekeepers, and how we prevented attacks on the rule of law," he said.

Referring to the results of the elections, Folkman said that Kulanu’s political power has become irrelevant. "I wish I had the political power to realize all the principles that I believe in, but that's not the case. There were results in the elections and I accept them, in contrast to quite a few people who are not prepared to accept the results of these elections."

He further claimed that his party will do everything to act responsibly, saying, "I will continue to adhere to my values, I will have to choose my battles, and I will do my utmost, if we are a part of a future coalition, to push the Israeli government to behave responsibly and put the citizen first.”

Earlier, Folkman had told Blue and White party activists who protested outside his home that he had changed his mind regarding sitting with Netanyahu while he is under an indictment.

"In the past, I said I would not sit with a prime minister with an indictment and today I changed my mind. I am willing to consider it," said MK Folkman, whose remarks caused an uproar. "The party and I supported the rule of law all along the way. Now we are irrelevant.”

Activists from the Blue and White party have been demonstrating in recent days outside the homes of MKs in protest against the Likud's intention to promote legislation that prevent any possibility of Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu being put on trial.

The protests are over the so-called “Immunity Law” proposed by the Likud, which would granting sitting prime ministers immunity from prosecution while they remain in office.

The bill, which was initiated by Likud MK Miki Zohar, was placed on the Knesset table earlier this week after having been submitted to the previous Knesset but not being promoted.




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