Irish Senate passes BDS resolution

Bill supporting boycott of Jewish products beyond 'Green Line' passed in Irish Senate by 25-20 majority

Arutz Sheva Staff,

BDS rally
BDS rally
Stefanie Loos, Reuters

The Irish Senate approved a bill calling for the boycott of Israeli products originating beyond the so-called 'Green Line' Wednesday.

The decision was approved by a majority of 25 to 20.

The Israeli Foreign Ministry issued a response to a decision saying that "the Irish Senate has given its hand to an aggressive, dangerous and radical populist anti-Israel boycott initiative that undermines prospects for a dialogue between Israel and the Palestinians."

"The absurdity in the course of the Irish Senate is that the boycott will harm the livelihood of many Palestinians working in the Israeli industrial zones affected by the boycott, and Israel will consider its steps in accordance with the developments in this legislation," the Foreign Ministry said.

The so-called “Occupied Territories Bill” was promoted by Irish Senator Frances Black. The discussion on the bill at the Irish senate was postponed in January after Ireland's Ambassador to Israel, Alison Kelly, was summoned for a meeting at the Foreign Ministry to clarify the legislative initiative.

While it does not specify Judea and Samaria, the Israeli government understood it as singling out the Jewish state. Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has condemned the initiative, saying that the goal of the proposed legislation “is to support the BDS movement and harm the State of Israel.”

Black recently posted a video to Twitter in which she announced that the bill would be discussed on July and called on Irish citizens to increase the pressure on lawmakers to support this bill.

The Irish government has offered tepid opposition to the bill. In January’s debate, Foreign Minister Simon Coveney condemned Israeli “settlements” but said the bill would have a “polarizing” effect “at this time” and stating that he would be “open to persuasion” in future if there were no progress in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process.








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