Canada: Anti-Semitic graffiti found in Winnipeg

Anti-Semitic graffiti found at multiple spots around Canadian city of Winnipeg. Mayor condemns.

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Ben Ariel,

Winnipeg skyline
Winnipeg skyline
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Anti-Semitic graffiti was found at multiple spots around the Canadian city of Winnipeg on Wednesday, Global News reports.

Winnipeg Mayor Brian Bowman condemned the incident and called on locals to denounce acts of hate.

The graffiti read “Lost white civilizations” and “Soros wants you dead”, according to Global News.

It was condemned by B’nai Brith Canada, whose spokesman Ran Ukashi said, “Having these kind of symbols for children and families to see is distressing. It’s very concerning that people have this way of thinking, because it can lead to more serious issues in the future.”

Some places were covered with symbols like the Star of David, and “Jewish supremacy” written underneath. Other benches made direct references to Nazi symbols, according to Global News.

“It was just riddled with swastikas, white pride,” Ukashi said.

Winnipeg police are aware of the incidents and said an officer who works directly on hate crimes is investigating.

Bowman condemned the graffiti on Wednesday, saying in a statement, “These intolerant acts of hate are reprehensible and offensive to our community and will not deter our ongoing efforts towards strengthening inclusiveness in our city.”

“I am personally sickened to see this in our city and call on Winnipeggers of all backgrounds to join me in denouncing acts of hate, like this,” he added.

This is the second time in recent months that an anti-Semitic incident has been recorded in Winnipeg.

On New Year’s Eve, a package with an anti-Semitic epithet and a reference to a Nazi death squad was left on the doorstep of a Jewish couple in the city.

Elsewhere in Canada, swastika graffiti was painted in the University of Toronto last October.

Last August, pro-Israel supporters were attacked by leftists in Montreal.

In November of 2016, a spate of racist graffiti targeted religious communities across the Canadian capital Ottawa, including a local synagogue and a Jewish community center.








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