Iran sticking to nuclear deal, says UN watchdog

International Atomic Energy Agency report says Iran is sticking to the 2015 nuclear deal with major world powers.

Ben Ariel, Canada,

IAEA headquarters
IAEA headquarters
iStock

Iran is sticking to the 2015 nuclear deal with major world powers, according to a report by the UN atomic watchdog released Friday.

The new International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report, seen by the AFP news agency, showed Iran's nuclear activities remain reduced, making any push to an atomic bomb much harder than before the agreement.

Iran's stock of low-enriched uranium remained below the agreed limit of 300 kilograms (661 pounds), the report said.

The quarterly assessment said Iran "has not pursued the construction of the Arak... reactor" -- which could give it weapons-grade plutonium -- and has not enriched uranium above low purity levels.

Iran's stock of heavy water, used as a reactor coolant, was 128.2 tonnes, according to the IAEA report. Iran has previously inched above an agreed ceiling of 130 tonnes a number of times and has shipped the excess abroad.

The report is the latest IAEA report in recent months to determine that Iran is complying with the nuclear deal it sealed with major world powers in 2015.

The agreement between Iran and the United States, Russia, China, France, Britain and Germany was agreed in Vienna in July 2015, after years of negotiations. It came into force in January 2016.

The accord saw Iran substantially reduce its nuclear program and submit to ultra-close IAEA oversight, making much tougher any "breakout" attempt to make a bomb before the world can react.

The nuclear deal has been criticized by U.S. President Donald Trump, who said it was “disastrous” and pledging to annul it.

Most recently, Trump described the nuclear deal as “the worst deal I’ve ever seen negotiated” and accused the Islamic Republic of “disrespecting” the United States because of the deal.

At the same time, Trump recently renewed a waiver of nuclear-related U.S. sanctions on Iran though he has ordered a review of the main nuclear deal.

(Arutz Sheva’s North American desk is keeping you updated until the start of Shabbat in New York. The time posted automatically on all Arutz Sheva articles, however, is Israeli time.)




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