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Romney Tops List of Pro-Jewish Non-Jews

Republican candidate for president cited alongside Rupert Murdoch, leaders of Canada and India.
By Gil Ronen
First Publish: 8/9/2012, 9:42 PM

Mitt Romney
Mitt Romney
Israel news photo: Flash 90

The presumptive Republican candidate for president, Mitt Romney, tops a Jewish publication's list of non-Jews "who are most positively influencing the Jewish future."

"Love or hate his politics," writes the Algemeiner, "Romney’s vocal support for Israel as a contender for the world’s top job, has challenged the incumbent and many Americans to rediscover their own understanding of the United States’ special relationship with the Jewish state."

"His tough stance on Iran has put the Ayatollahs on notice.  In his recent trip to the Holy Land, he acknowledged Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and cited the historic connection of the Jewish people with the land, which has gone a long way in underlining the Jewish narrative regarding Israel on the world stage, thereby earning him the top spot this year."

Also on the list were:

Rupert Murdoch, CEO of News Corporation, who was described as "the patriarch of an unparalleled international media conglomerate that has stood out for its overall fair portrayal of Israel in related news items."

Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, whose "support for Israel and friendship to Canada’s Jewish community has been unwavering."

Manmohan Singh, Prime Minister of India, who is cited as being largely responsible for cultivating and developing the "vital alliance" between his country and Israel.

MK Ayoob Kara, Deputy Israeli Minister, "a Druze Israeli who has been recognized as the Knesset’s most pro-Israel Arab."

Eric Schmidt, Google Chairman, who said in June: “There are no disadvantages to investing in Israel – just advantages. Israel has the most important high-tech center in the world after the US.”

Michael Gove, British Secretary of State for Education, who has been "particularly active in stamping out curriculum anti-Semitism that appeared on more than one occasion," and has shown support for Jewish education, according to the Algemeiner.