Israeli teen accused of killing Arab woman freed to house arrest

Ruling comes after forensic expert opinion notes injuries to head of the deceased do not correspond to scenario of blow from a stone.

Arutz Sheva Staff,

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The Lod District Court on Tuesday decided to send to house arrest with electronic shackles the Jewish youth accused of killing an Arab woman in an alleged stone-throwing incident.

The court delayed the release of the boy until tomorrow, in order to enable the state to decide whether to appeal to the Supreme Court against the release.

Arab woman Aisha A-Rabi was allegedly killed by a stone thrown at the vehicle in which she was traveling near the Samaria community of Rehelim in October 2018.

This morning's hearing was held in light of an opinion submitted by the director of the National Center of Forensic Medicine, Dr. Chen Kugel, according to which the injuries found on the head of the Arab woman do not correspond to the scenario of a blow from a stone.

"Two doctors supported me, claiming that the injuries to the deceased’s skull were consistent with damage caused by very high energy, and not from one blow of a stone," Kugel noted in the opinion published on the Walla website. "One of these doctors also supported my view that there appear to be at least two focal points of impact.”

Dr. Kugel wrote that "Two other doctors believed that, based on the data presented to us, the quality of the imperfect images and the relatively undetailed description in the opinion, it is impossible to decide either way. I should mention that there are known cases in which people were killed by a head injury due to a stone thrown at them while driving in a vehicle.”

"This is a known phenomenon that has happened in the past. The argument is not whether it is possible to die as a result of a blow to the head, but as noted earlier - the fit of the injuries to the system that were found.”

"A search of professional literature that I undertook did not reveal any cases in which such extensive damage to the bones of the skull was caused by a stone." Dr. Kugel concluded: "In the end, I am the signatory to the opinion and stand with quiet conscience behind what is written there."




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