Eighth British Labour MP resigns over anti-Semitism

Joan Ryan quits Labour Party, citing a "culture of anti-Jewish racism".

Elad Benari,

Jeremy Corbyn
Jeremy Corbyn
Reuters

An eighth MP with the British Labour Party on Tuesday quit the party, citing a "culture of anti-Jewish racism," the BBC reported.

The move by Joan Ryan came a day after a group of seven Labour lawmakers, including British-Jewish MP Luciana Berger, left the party to form the Independent Group in Parliament.

Ryan, an MP for Enfield North, said she was "horrified, appalled and angered" by Labour's failure to tackle anti-Semitism, saying its leadership allowed "Jews to be abused with impunity".

Ryan said she did not believe Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn was fit to lead the country.

In announcing her decision on Twitter, she said she would continue to represent the north London seat in Parliament.

In her resignation statement, she said Corbyn and the "Stalinist clique which surrounds him" was not providing real opposition at a moment of crisis for the country.

Instead, added Ryan, the leadership was focused on "purging their perceived ideological enemies within and obsessing over issues of little interest to British people."

She repeated Berger's claim that the party had become "institutionally anti-Semitic", suggesting that under Corbyn's leadership Israel had been "singled out for demonization and de-legitimization."

"The Labour Party under Jeremy Corbyn has become infected with the scourge of anti-Jewish racism. The problem simply did not exist in the party before his election as leader," stated Ryan, according to the BBC.

The British Labour party has been embroiled in a series of controversies related to anti-Semitism in recent years. Dozens of Labour members have been suspended over their anti-Semitic statements.

Corbyn himself has been accused of holding anti-Semitic views by senior UK Jewish leaders. Corbyn has also been criticized for calling Hamas and Hezbollah his "friends" and for outright refusing to condemn those two terrorist organizations despite being urged to do so by local Jewish groups.

Much of the criticism against Corbyn is over his playing down the anti-Semitism in his party and alienating Jews.

Corbyn insists he is not an anti-Semite. In a recent interview with the BBC he described anti-Semitism “as a scourge in any society, I have opposed it all my life…I have spent my whole life opposing racism in any form and I will die fighting racism."




top