The bill that could change rulings in Judea and Samaria

Justice Minister Shaked aims to reduce burden on Supreme Court by transferring authority for several issues to lower court.

Uzi Baruch,

Ayelet Shaked
Ayelet Shaked
Flash 90

The Knesset's Constitution, Law and Justice Committee rejected the opposition's complaints regarding Justice Minister Ayelet Shaked's (Jewish Home) bill to transfer authority to rule on several administrative issues in Judea and Samaria from the Supreme Court to Jerusalem's Court for Administrative Affairs.

The bill would only affect issues regarding Israeli authorities in Judea and Samaria. It would not affect those living under the Palestinian Authority.

Currently, administrative issues in these Judea and Samaria go straight to the Supreme Court, while the same issues in other areas of Israel go first to a local court.

The current version of the bill will be voted on next week, with the bill's backers aiming to pass the law before the end of the Knesset's summer session.

The bill aims to achieve three goals: Firstly, to reduce the burden n the Supreme Court. Each year, hundreds of requests to delay the demolition of illegal structures are submitted to the Supreme Court, clogging up the system and preventing the court from properly investigating the issues.

Secondly, to normalize Judea and Samaria when it comes to legal issues.

Thirdly, to end to the Supreme Court's monopoly and discrimination against residents of Judea and Samaria, as well as provide the ability to investigate proofs and clarify facts before such cases are ruled on. This would effectively return the burden of proof to the claimant instead of placing it on the defendant.

In addition to administrative issues, the Court for Administrative Affairs will be able to rule on issues of whether to allow Palestinian Authority criminals entry into or exit from Israel. Those who wish to appeal a ruling will now submit their complaints to Jerusalem's Court for Administrative Affairs instead of to the Supreme Court.

Additional issues to be transferred to the Court for Administrative Affairs include restraining orders and appeals regarding the freedom of access to information.

The Supreme Court will retain authority over appeals against decisions of IDF commanders in Judea and Samaria, as well as authority over appeals against the decisions of government ministers.








top