'Israel and Iran are not necessarily on a collision course'

Senior researcher Yossi Kuperwasser believes that Iran feels Israeli deterrence and is not interested in a major confrontation.

Arutz Sheva Staff,

Brig. Gen. (Res.) Yossi Kuperwasser
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Yossi Kuperwasser
Yoni Kempinski

Brig. Gen. (ret.) Yossi Kuperwasser, former director-general of the Ministry of Strategic Affairs, who is currently the director of the Project on Regional Middle East Developments at the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, believes that "Israel and Iran are not necessarily on a collision course."

"It seems that Iran has decided to take on the war against Israel," Kuperwasser said. "This is why Iran has begun to build military bases inside Syria, wants to establish precision weapons factories in Lebanon, and tries to deliver weapons that are equal to Hezbollah."

Kuperwasser was also asked about the Russian role in the Israeli-Iranian conflict, saying that in his opinion the Russians prefer to turn a blind eye to Iran's establishment because of short-term vision. "This is not the Russian interest that Iran ruled over Syria," says the former research officer at the Military Intelligence.

He said that Israel should convey this message to President Vladimir Putin and that it would seem that in view of the attack by the West, Putin, who feels humiliated by it, will be required to take steps as if and others on the issue.

"There is concern that Israel-Russia relations will be harmed in the wake of the attack on the West," Kuperwasser says, and does not negate Russia's appeal to Israel to moderate its attacks in Syria in the near future in order to prevent the West from mixing with Syria.

Brig. Gen. (Res.) Yossi Kuperwasser
Yoni Kempinski







top