PLO could declare Judea and Samaria a 'state under occupation'

Fatah member says PLO will consider declaring areas liberated by Israel in 1967 as "a state under occupation."

Elad Benari,

Azzam al-Ahmad
Azzam al-Ahmad
Reuters

Azzam al-Ahmad, a member of the Fatah Central Committee, said on Sunday that the upcoming meeting of the Palestine Liberation Organization's (PLO) Central Council will consider declaring areas liberated by Israel in 1967 as "a state under occupation."

Speaking to Voice of Palestine radio and quoted by the official Palestinian Authority (PA) Wafa news agency, Ahmad said the Central Council is going to meet in Ramallah before the middle of next month and will conduct a comprehensive political review of the peace process and the steps required by Palestinian Arabs.

"It is not possible to continue with the relationship with Israel as long as the latter keeps denying the rights of our people, particularly in Jerusalem," he was quoted as having said.

Further diplomatic action will take place in the UN General Assembly, the Security Council and even the International Criminal Court as well as other international organizations in response to U.S. President Donald Trump’s recent decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, Ahmad warned.

“We are facing a continuous, cumulative and long political, diplomatic and popular battle," he declared.

The PA has reacted angrily to Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. It first sought to condemn the move at the UN Security Council, but the U.S. vetoed that motion.

Then, the motion was taken to the General Assembly in which the U.S. has no veto power, where it passed with 128 countries voting to condemn Trump for recognizing Jerusalem as the Israeli capital.

In addition, PA chairman Mahmoud Abbas has announced that the PA would "no longer accept" any peace plan proposed by the United States, saying it “has proven to be a dishonest mediator in the peace process.”

The PA had planned to boycott a visit to the region by U.S. Vice President Mike Pence, which was ultimately delayed to the vote on the budget in Washington.








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