Muslims to flock to Al-Aqsa

Al-Aqsa imams say prayers won't be held in mosque, call on Muslims to come 'as close as possible' to Temple Mount and hold 'day of rage.'

Contact Editor
Dalit Halevi,

Muslims turn their backs to Al-Aqsa during prayer
Muslims turn their backs to Al-Aqsa during prayer
Suliman Keder, Flash 90

Palestininan Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas returned home from China earlier than planned because of the tensions on the Temple Mount.

At the same time, Abbas is pressuring international bodies to force Israel to rescind its decision to place metal detectors at the Temple Mount and Al-Aqsa Mosque entrances.

The security measures, including metal detectors, were implemented this week after three terrorists from the Haifa District's Umm al-Fahm murdered two policemen in a terror attack and wounded a third last Friday.

Abbas called an emergency meeting of PA leaders, including the Palestinian Liberation Organization's executive committee and Fatah's Central Committee.

International and Islamic bodies currently in Jerusalem, including the High Follow-Up Committee and Al-Aqsa Mosque, declared a "day of rage" in protest of the new security measures.

Jerusalem Mufti Sheikh Mohammed Hussein reiterated his encouragement to Muslims to come as close as possible to Al-Aqsa mosque. The mosque's imams announced that Friday's prayers would not be held in the mosques themselves and called on Muslim residents of Jerusalem to come to the Old City and pray near - but not on - the Temple Mount.