Arabs: Israel is Judaizing Jerusalem

Arabs claim Israel is forcing Arab residents out of Jerusalem - ignoring the fact that Jerusalem is fighting for its Jewish majority.

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Dalit Halevi, Chana Roberts,

Jerusalem, capital of Israel
Jerusalem, capital of Israel
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Marking fifty years of the "Israeli occupation" in Jerusalem, the International Al-Quds Institution publicized a new report detailing the steps Israel has taken in order to "Judaize Jerusalem."

According to the authors, Israel's strategy for Judaizing Jerusalem, the holiest city for Jews and only the thrid holiest for Muslims, is based on three "secrets": alleged explusion of the Arab residents of the city, bringing "settlers" to replace them, and changing the face of the area.

The authors claimed that Israel implements this strategy, among other things, by creating a "safety belt" around Jerusalem. This "safety belt" is created by placing important military sites in sensitive areas, building secure access roads between Jewish towns and blocs, stopping the Arab towns' growth, turning Jerusalem into a city which evicts Arabs, encouraging "settlers" to come to the city, and isolating Jerusalem from "other Palestinian cities."

The authors term Jews wanting to live in Jerusalem "settlers."

In reality, illegal Arab construction in and around Jerusalem is flourishing while authorities turn a blind eye. Even as Israel's government builds a new train line connecting Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, Arabs insist on building illegal outposts in strategic areas, from which they can easily carry out terror attacks.

In fact, according to former Likud MK and Education Minister Gideon Sa'ar, Jerusalem is well on its way to losing its Jewish majority unless something changes, and soon.

In addition, while less than 2,000 Jewish housing units were approved for construction, an entire new Arab neighborhood is planned for Jerusalem, and the government approved 14,000 new housing units for Arabs near Qalqilya in Area C (controlled by Israel) of Judea and Samaria, although that.plan is up for reassessment by the government cabinet.