How compensation from Iran will save lives in Israel

Family of terror victim which won lawsuit against Iran for terror financing uses funds to donate intensive care unit to United Hatzalah.

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Arutz Sheva Staff,

Dedication of new ambulance
Dedication of new ambulance
United Hatzalah spokesperson

Alan Beer, 46, a new immigrant from the United States, was murdered in 2003 in a terrorist attack on bus No. 14A near Davidka Square in downtown Jerusalem.

His family sued Iran for financing the terrorist attack in a federal court in the United States. They successfully proved Iran's connection to the financing of the terror attack and won the lawsuit.

When the family received part of the compensation money the court awarded them, they decided to use the funds to donate a mobile intensive care unit to the United Hatzala organization for life-saving activities dedicated in Alan's memory.

Today, at the Davidka Square in Jerusalem, on the anniversary of the terrorist attack in which Alan was murdered, a dedication ceremony was held for the ICU in his memory.

Dovi Meisel, director of international activities for United Hatzalah and Beer's nephew, said at the event: "Today, at this place, a circle has been closed. 14 years ago, Alan was killed along with 16 other people, and 100 others were wounded in the terrorist attack on bus line 14. In this place where people lost their lives, we are launching an intensive care unit that will save lives."

Eli Beer, the president and founder of United Hatzalah, said: "This is the first United Hatzalah intensive care unit to join the 24 ambulances of United Hatzalah, and this ambulance will save lives and operate for free for the welfare of the residents of Jerusalem."