Antenna extracted from baby's throat in northern Israel

8-month old baby found to have swallowed antenna from a remote control car.

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Orly Harari,

X-ray image of antenna inside child's throat
X-ray image of antenna inside child's throat
Ziv Hospital

An 8-month old baby from the upper Galilee was taken to the emergency room in Ziv Hospital in Tzfat after the child swallowed part of a toy.

Using x-ray images of the boy, doctors at Ziv Hospital found the antenna of a remote control car stuck in the child’s throat.

The boy’s parents told hospital officials that their son had been playing with the car, and that the remote control had apparently broken apart. The child then placed part of the broken toy in his mouth. Despite repeated efforts to retrieve the broken pieces from the child’s mouth, the parents were unable to extract the antenna. After their failed attempts to remove the antenna, the boy’s parents took him to Ziv Hospital.

Dr. Ella Even-Tov, a senior physicial in the Nose, Ear, and Throat department of the hospital, said the child was crying hysterically and suffering from serious throat pains.

Based on the x-ray images taken of the boy’s throat, the Ziv staff “ascertained that the antenna was attached to a small metal coil that had become lodged in the child’s palate the same way a fishing hook becomes lodged in a fish’s mouth, endangering the child,” Even-Tov said.

Initially staff members in the children’s emergency room believed it would be necessary to operate on the boy in order to remove the antenna and coil – a serious procedure for a child his age.

Luckily, however, doctors were able to remove the coil and the antenna without surgery.

“The extraction of the antenna was successfully completed during the first attempt, with no surgery necessary,” a spokesperson for Ziv Hospital said. “Immediately afterwards the baby calmed down from his crying and began to smile to those around him. The parents also breathed a sigh of relief and warmly thanked the doctors.”