Leftist MK: Regulation law is a waste of time

Broshi slams government's inability to make a decision; says there is no question that Amona residents need to be expelled.

Hezki Baruch,

Kindergarten Children in a Twn in Samaria
Kindergarten Children in a Twn in Samaria
Mateh Maavak Amona/Gidi Sharon

MK Eitan Broshi (Zionist Union), former secretary of the Kibbutz Movement, and former Assistant Defense Minister for Settlement Matters, attacked the government Saturday evening, on the topic of its inability to make decisions regarding the future of Amona.

Broshi explained that, "The government is hesitating and is unable to make decisions about 'settlements.' As a result, the chances that the government will succeed in following the High Court's orders to destroy Amona before the end of the year are slim to none."

According to him, the attempts to pass the Regulation Law against the wishes of the Attorney General, are not serious and waste precious time.

Broshi, who recently visited Amona, said this evening that, "From my experience as Assistant Defense Minister for Settlement Matters, and [from when I was] responsible for the expulsion of Migron and several houses in Amona, I know how complicated and complex such an expulsion can be....I am therefore wondering why the government is idling, instead of making a decision, despite the fact that the High Court has ordered the expulsion to be carried out by the end of December."

"When I visited Amona a month and a half ago, I came in order to learn about the topic and listen to the residents, but I also came to look them in the eye and tell them that they cannot continue living on private land."

MK Broshi emphasized that Amona is an "illegal settlement" that has been sitting on private land for more than twenty years.

"It is the government's job to find an agreeable, correct and legal solution as much as possible. It does not make me happy to see 40 families, with 200 children, expelled from their homes, but the law is above everything. The government's inability to make a decision only makes things more difficult for everyone," he concluded.

There is no evidence that the disputed land in Amona belongs to any Arab Palestinian. It cannot be considered "privately owned" unless there is a legitimate owner. Israel's Supreme Court, however, does not examine ownership issues, but receives depositions from both sides before making a decision. That gifted land was registered does not give it title or the status of deeded land.




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