Americans prefer Jewish president to Evangelical

Pew Research Center survey finds U.S. voters least likely to choose a candidate who doesn’t believe in God.

Shoshana Miskin,

Senator Bernie Sanders
Senator Bernie Sanders
Reuters

A new Pew Research Center survey on faith and politics reveals how religion is shaping the 2016 Presidential campaign.

According to the figures, only 10% of Americans are less likely to vote for a presidential candidate because he is Jewish, while 20% said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate who is an evangelical Christian. Half of all respondents said they are less likely to vote for a candidate who doesn’t believe in God.

A full 80% percent of respondents said a candidate being Jewish makes them no more or less likely to vote for him, 10% percent said they were less likely to vote for a Jew for president, and 8% said they were more likely.

Among Republicans and those leaning Republican, 10% said they were more likely to vote for a candidate who is Jewish, 7% said less likely, and 81% said it made no difference.

Among Democrats and those leaning Democratic, 5% said they were more likely to vote for a Jewish candidate, 10% said they were less likely, and 84% said it made no difference.

The openly socialist Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is the only Jewish candidate currently in the 2016 presidential race.

The poll found also found the biggest liabilities for presidential candidates:

  • 51% percent of respondents said they would be less likely to vote for an atheist for president.
  • 42% said they would be less likely to vote for a Muslim candidate
  • 41% said they were less likely to vote for a candidate who has personal financial troubles
  • 37% said they were less likely to vote for a candidate who had an extramarital affair
  • 26% were less likely to vote for a gay or lesbian candidate.

The telephone poll of 2,009 American adults was conducted January 7-14 and had a margin of error of ±2.5% points.

The full report can be read here.




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