Poll: Yisrael Beytenu Down, 17% Undecided

New poll shows Liberman's party harmed by corruption scandal, ongoing Yishai-Shas struggle, large ambivalence in public over vying parties.

Yoni Kempinski, Ari Yashar,

Avigdor Liberman
Avigdor Liberman
Miriam Alster/Flash 90

As election fever continues the polls keep churning out, with the latest conducted for Reshet Bet radio released Saturday showing Likud and Labor still neck and neck, and Yisrael Beytenu hampered by a recent corruption scandal surrounding senior ministers of the party.

The poll, conducted by the Rafi Smith Institute, indicates that Likud and Labor would tie at 23 mandates each, leading to a mad dash to form a coalition government - it also shows wide voter ambivalence as a large portion of respondents answered they are still undecided.

Jewish Home would get 17 seats, Moshe Kahlon's Kulanu party would get nine, and Yesh Atid would get eight.

Yisrael Beytenu also is predicted as getting eight in the latest poll, down from nine in an identical poll from a week ago. The party currently has 11 mandates from a joint run with Likud in the last elections.

The woes of Avigdor Liberman's party may be attributable to a corruption scandal that saw Deputy Interior Minister Faina Kirshenbaum and former Tourism Minister Stas Misezhnikov, both of the Yisrael Beytenu party, brought in for investigation last week.

Shas is shown as getting eight mandates while Eli Yishai's new Ha'am Itanu party would get three mandates but not pass the 3.25% threshold raised by the outgoing coalition government. The poll is the latest in a series of flip-flopping results, some showing Shas out and Ha'am Itanu in, and others showing the two splitting at four mandates apiece.

United Torah Judaism is shown in the poll as getting seven seats, Meretz six, and the Arab parties apparently running separately getting a cumulative total of eleven seats.

The poll, like all polls to this point, does not include former MK Dr. Michael Ben-Ari's Otzma Yehudit party.

In a telling statistic, the poll also found that a full 17% of the public still don't know which party to vote for, apparently indicating an ambivalence over the parties offered.


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