Regev: Livni-Labor Deal 'Enough to Make You Sick'

MK Miri Regev is happy over the union of Tzipi Livni and Yitzchak Herzog, because it will 'ruin the Labor Party.'

Yaakov Levi,

MK Miri Regev
MK Miri Regev
Flash 90

While she thinks that the new union between Tzipi Livni and Yitzchak Herzog under the banner of the Labor Party is a welcome one - because it will “ruin Labor, and I am very happy about that” - MK Miri Regev (Likud) still could not hold back her feelings. “It's enough to want to make you throw up,” she said.

With Livni and Herzog working together, the public will have a clear choice between left and right, and Livni, who has been through four parties in the past decade – moving from Likud to Kadima to her own Hatn'ua, which she is now abandoning – has a good track record of losing. “I'm very satisfied with this development, the public understands what is going on,” said Regev in a forum sponsored by daily newspaper Yediot Ahronot.

Still, the prospect of facing the team in a campaign gives her an upset stomach, she said – not because she feared they presented a challenge to Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu, but because of the negative campaign that could be expected in the coming months.

Regev congratulated Netanyahu for emerging victorious in a vote taken by Likud members Wednesday night to move the primaries up to early January. “Everyone was sure Netanyahu would lose that vote, and he didn't,” she said. “In the same way, everyone is sure he will lose the elections, but he will not.”

Looking at the union from a different point of view was Labor MK Stav Shapir. Speaking at the same forum, she said that the union “is a development that gives many of us hope. It's wonderful that these two leaders can put their egos to the side and work together. This is not just 'buzz' – Herzog and Livni present us with a different kind of leadership.”

Regarding the Likud's policies on social welfare, Shapir said that “for 2,000 years they haven't done anything. For 15 years you kept the minimum wage where it has been.” Responding to Shapir's criticism, Regev said that “you got elected in the wave of social protest over high prices, but you haven't really done anything. You're just using the price protest movement to get yourself ahead.”




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