New Bill to Revoke Residency Status of Terrorists

MKs Shaked and Tzur draft new bill giving Minister of Interior authority to revoke permanent resident status of convicted terrorists.

Ido Ben Porat, Cynthia Blank,

MK Ayelet Shaked
MK Ayelet Shaked
Hillel Maeir

Together, MK Ayelet Shaked (Jewish Home) and MK David Tzur (Hatnua) have drafted a bill calling for the revocation of residency status for convicted terrorists. 

Palestinian Arabs living in eastern Jerusalem or the Golan Heights - over the 1949 Armistice lines - who denied the offer for citizenship, are considered permanent residents under Israeli law. They have the right to apply for citizenship, are entitled to municipal services and benefits, and have municipal voting rights.

This bill seeks to allow revoking the residency of those convicted of terrorism as defined in the Prohibition on Terrorist Financing Law. It was filed in light of Israel's current security situation. Many permanent residents of the State have been involved in attacks and acts of terrorism. 

While the Minister of Interior is currently able to revoke the citizenship of a person involved in terrorist activities, the same action or punishment does not yet apply for residents convicted of the exact same offenses. 

"The lacuna in the existing law effectively creates a situation in which a citizen engaged in terror know his citizenship can be revoked and many rights confiscated from him, but a permanent resident in Israel knows that he has nothing lose, because there is this loophole," Shaked and Tzur's bill states. 

The bill would provide the Minister of Interior with the authority to revoke the permanent residency permits of people convicted of: terrorist crimes, violations against the sovereignty of the state, aiding an enemy during war, instigating war, serving in enemy armed forces, espionage and disclosing confidential information. 

The explanatory notes to the bill state that "the repair to the law is necessary both from a security standpoint and morally."

"From a perspective of defense, we must limit the length of their stay in Israel as well as their possibility of movement within the country. And morally, it is inconceivable that a terrorist convicted of such serious harm to this country should benefit from the many rights Israel provides to all its residents."

"In recent weeks we have exposed to cruel and horrible acts of terrorism, many at the hands of residents of eastern Jerusalem. These terrorists fall under the definition of 'residents.' This law will stand as another level of deterrence for these horrible terrorists. Not only will their houses be demolished physically, but their existential and residential status will also be destroyed," Shaked stated.

"Anyone who acts against the state and its citizens should and will receive a red card." 




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