Missile mishap?
Russia Says US-Israeli Iran Missile Test Failed

Russia claims to have found missile meant to be shot down in Arrow 2 missile defense test in Mediterranean Sea.

Ari Yashar,

Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon at Arrow 2 tes
Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon at Arrow 2 tes
Flash 90

Russian Defense Ministry spokesperson Maj. Gen. Igor Konashenkov claimed on Tuesday that the joint Israeli and American test of an Arrow (Hetz) 2 interceptor missile, conducted in a simulated ballistic missile attack by Iran, failed.

According to Konashenkov the target missile, which was supposed to be shot down in the test, was found by Russia in the Mediterranean Sea 300 kilometers (over 180 miles) away from Tel Aviv, reports Walla!.

Earlier on Tuesday an Israeli source close to the test told the Hebrew-language news source that the test, which was conducted over the sea, was a "partial success."

The test was conducted by the Israeli Defense Ministry, together with the American Missile Defense Agency (MDA). The Defense Ministry said in a statement "an Arrow 2 missile was launched and performed its flight sequence as planned. The results are being analyzed by program engineers."

In the test, a target Ankor (Sparrow) missile was fired over the Mediterranean, with an Arrow 2 fired to intercept it. According to the Russian claims the Ankor escaped the test unharmed, landing in the sea.

A senior security source said "the final results (of the test) still can't be determined. Several days will be required to process the figures."

The Arrow missile defense system is designed to intercept long-range ICBM (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missiles) of the type held by Iran; the Islamic regime has been continuing its nuclear program despite ongoing talks with world powers, with Israel warning it is "closer than ever" to obtaining a nuclear weapon.

The Arrow 2, tested in the Tuesday simulation, is built for interception within the atmosphere, whereas the new Arrow 3, still in stages of development, operates at even higher altitudes by taking out missiles before they even reenter the earth's atmosphere.




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