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Journalist: What Are We Getting Out of the Ceasefire Agreement?

Journalist and radio host Sharon Gal slams reported ceasefire deal that was reached between Israel and Hamas.
By Benny Moshe
First Publish: 8/19/2014, 3:16 AM

Diggers in Hamas Gaza tunnel
Diggers in Hamas Gaza tunnel
Flash 90

Journalist and radio host Sharon Gal had harsh criticism on Monday over a supposed ceasefire deal between Israel and Hamas, as reported by Palestinian Authority (PA) based media outlets.

According to the reports, which were not confirmed by Israeli sources, the deal would include the opening of all border crossings in Gaza, the reconstruction of the coastal enclave under the supervision of the PA and increasing the fishing zone from six to nine miles.

As well, according to the PA reports, a discussion of Hamas’s demands for a seaport and airport and the release of terrorists who were freed in the Shalit deal and re-arrested would be postponed for one month from the date of the signing of the agreement.

"If the reports are true (and I hope they are not) - then I am missing just one little thing in the agreement: What we are getting!" Gal wrote on his Facebook page.

"If it was indeed decided to end the blockade, allow the entry of construction materials into Gaza (under international supervision - which is a joke as we know), increase the fishing range and promise to discuss the seaport next month - then we are being tricked. Prepare for the next round," he added.

Meanwhile on Monday night, Israeli and Palestinian Arab negotiators agreed to extend a temporary ceasefire in Gaza by 24 hours to conduct more talks on a long-term truce.

The previous five-day ceasefire was set to expire at midnight local time (2100 GMT).

"Both sides have agreed to a 24-hour ceasefire," an official with the Palestinian delegation in Cairo said.

Diplomatic sources in Jerusalem confirmed the extension, telling Kol Yisrael radio that at the request of Egypt, the ceasefire will be extended for another day so that negotiations on a permanent truce can continue.