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U.S. Man Given 14 Years for Supporting Al-Qaeda

Khalid Ouazzani of Kansas City sentenced to 14 years in prison for conspiring to help send money to finance Al-Qaeda's terrorist activities.
By Elad Benari
First Publish: 10/8/2013, 5:42 AM

Al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri
Al-Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri
AFP photo

A Missouri man was sentenced to 14 years in prison Monday for conspiring to help send money to finance Al-Qaeda's terrorist activities, reports UPI.

A federal judge sentenced Khalid Ouazzani, 32, of Kansas City after he admitted his role in a conspiracy to provide material support to the terror group, along with bank fraud and money laundering charges, according to the report.

Ouazzani, a native of Morocco and a naturalized U.S. citizen, admitted he worked to support Al-Qaeda from August 2007 to this past February, and pledged an oath of support to the terrorist group in June 2008.

He said he personally provided more than $23,000 to the group and performed other tasks for Al-Qaeda, according to UPI.

Ouazzani also obtained a $175,000 line of credit commercial loan from a bank and used substantial amounts of the proceeds for personal purposes.

Last week, a joint U.S.-Australian citizen was jailed for 18 years for his part in an Al-Qaeda fundraising ring.

Between the years 2007 and 2009, 37-year-old Sabirhan Hasanoff helped funnel around $67,000 to Al-Qaeda affiliates in various countries, including Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), the Yemeni franchise of the Islamist terror group considered its most dangerous branch by U.S. authorities.

He and another man, Wisam El-Hanafi, also sent bomb-making equipment to terrorist operatives overseas.

Both men were residents of Brooklyn, New York, and were apparently influenced by another American Islamist, Anwar al-Awlaki, a former AQAP leader who regularly called on Muslims in the west to carry out "lone-wolf" style terrorist attacks, independent of any formal Al Qaeda network if need be.

Awlaki is believed to have incited or inspired a number of such attacks and attempted attacks by Muslim extremists in western countries, including the infamous "Fort Hood Massacre," in which U.S. Army psychiatrist Nidal Malik Hasan killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 others in a shooting spree at an army base in Fort Hood, Texas.