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Man Who Wouldn’t Teach ‘Rabin Legacy’ Wins NIS 400,000

Assistant Principal fired for objecting to program exalting former PM Yitzchak Rabin has been awarded 400,000 shekels.
By Maayana Miskin
First Publish: 10/3/2013, 3:28 PM

Former Israeli PM Yitzchak Rabin
Former Israeli PM Yitzchak Rabin
Flash 90

An Assistant Principal who was fired for objecting to a program extolling the legacy of Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin has been awarded 400,000 shekels.

Yisrael Shiran expressed strong disagreement in the year 2000 to a proposed program to honor Rabin and teach students about his “legacy of peace” on the occasion of the annual Rabin Day memorial.

Rabin led Israel into the Oslo Accords, under which the PLO terrorist group renounced terrorism and was allowed to settle in Judea, Samaria and Gaza as the Palestinian Authority, and to obtain weapons. He was assassinated in 1995 by Yigal Amir, who said his objection to Rabin’s agreements with the PLO was the motive for the slaying.

Whilst nearly all Israelis, from left to right, condemn the assassination, many also reject the lionization of Rabin by the Israeli left, saying that the Oslo Accords were in fact a disaster for the Jewish State and resulted in a wave of terrorism which killed and injured thousands.

Mourning his murder is one thing, they say, but promoting his legacy is something else entirely.

In a letter to his superiors, Shiran echoed such sentiments:

“Ever since the horrible murder of the belated Prime Minister, the Education Ministry has been ordering that we hold memorial rallies and talk to students about Rabin’s legacy of peace…. We cannot in any way agree that a man who gave weapons to enemies who are seeking to destroy us is someone whose legacy, path and personality we should be discussing.”

After he was fired, Shiran sued the Education Ministry, the former Haifa District administrator Yaakov Weisel, former National Head of Bible Studies Yissaschar Goelman, and the former director of elementary education, Sara Reuter.

On Thursday morning, the Jerusalem District Court ruled in Shiran’s favor, and ordered that he be given 400,000 shekels in compensation.

“This is an important day,” Shiran told Arutz Sheva. “There’s no joy like that of having things resolved after a hard period, even a very hard period.”

“I’m grateful to G-d and to my attorney for this ruling,” he added.