Daily Israel Report

Iran Neighbor Accepts First Israeli Ambassador

The Central Asian state of Turkmenistan, which shares border with Iran, has accepted the credentials of the first ever Israeli ambassador.
By Rina Tavi
First Publish: 6/20/2013, 2:49 PM

Women walk down steps beneath a portrait of Turkmenistan's President
Women walk down steps beneath a portrait of Turkmenistan's President
Rueters

The Central Asian state of Turkmenistan, which shares a 1,000 kilometer border with Iran, has accepted the credentials of the first ever Israeli ambassador to the country, state media said Wednesday.

President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov received the ambassadorial credentials of senior Israeli diplomat Shemi Tzur, the government newspaper Neutral Turkmenistan said, according to the AFP news agency.

The paper said that Tzur presented Berdymukhamedov with a greeting from President Shimon Peres who expressed interest in establishing a full dialogue with the overwhelmingly Muslim but strongly secular desert nation.

Tzur also invited Berdymukhamedov to make his first visit to Israel. 

Diplomatic relations between ex-Soviet Turkmenistan and Israel were established in 1992 and the Jewish state first announced a plan to send an ambassador to Ashgabat in 2009.

However Ashgabat never accepted the credentials of the first candidate for ambassador, Reuven Daniel, an Israeli intelligence agent whose nomination had reportedly irked Iran.

A second candidate was also rebuffed and according to media reports Turkmenistan finally accepted the nomination of Tzur after several months of negotiations, AFP reported.

The Israeli ambassador will be the second representative of the Jewish state in a Muslim ex-Soviet country bordering Iran. Israel already has an envoy in Azerbaijan with whom it has built strong relations much to the concern of Tehran.

Berdymukhamedov has made stabs at reform in his reclusive nation since taking over after the death of his notoriously eccentric predecessor Saparmurat Niyazov in 2006.

The European Union, the United States and China are all eyeing its vast gas resources but the country remains one of the most isolated in the world.