Daily Israel Report

Slomiansky 'Vote Buying' Case to be Closed

Police expected to recommend that MK Nissan Slomiansky not be prosecuted on charges of “vote buying”.
By Arutz Sheva Staff
First Publish: 5/22/2013, 2:15 AM

Nissan Slomiansky
Nissan Slomiansky
Flash 90

The Israel Police is expected to recommend that the prosecution close the case against MK Nissan Slomiansky (Bayit Yehudi) and suggest that he not be prosecuted on charges of “vote buying”, Channel 2 News reported on Tuesday.

According to the report, the police investigation, the climax of which took place two weeks ago when Slomiansky was questioned for hours by the Fraud Investigation Unit, revealed that the MK did not commit any criminal offense.

Slomiansky came under investigation on suspicion of buying votes in the Bayit Yehudi’s primaries.

The affair was made public in February, when Israeli media reported that police were investigating allegations Slomiansky had paid money in exchange for votes in his party’s primaries.

The reports indicated that the police had received recordings, made by a private investigator, in which a vote contractor admits that the MK gave him cigarette packages containing large amounts of money.

The reports at that time noted that the vote contractor who was recorded changed his story several times during questioning by the police, at one point saying he made up the story about receiving the cigarette packages.

MK Slomiansky at the time rejected all the accusations against him, saying, “It’s all lies. I have been in the public system for decades and have never been tainted with any wrongdoing, and suddenly all these hallucinatory rumors are spread.”

Amit Segal, the Knesset correspondent for Channel 2 News, wrote a post on his Facebook page on Tuesday in which he admitted that he had received word of the story months before it was exposed and was even prepared to go on the air with it, but decided to pull the story when he realized that the vote contractor “sounded too good to be true.”

“The moral of the story is that it is sometimes better to lose a news item and not lose the truth,” wrote Segal.