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Posner Family’s Rabbi: Hug Your Children

“Hug your children. Don’t think life is somewhere over the rainbow,” said the rabbi of parents of massacre victim Noah Posner.
By Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
First Publish: 12/16/2012, 1:15 PM

 The families of victims grieve near Sandy Hook Elementary School
The families of victims grieve near Sandy Hook Elementary School
Reuters

“Hug your children. Don’t think life is somewhere over the rainbow,” said the rabbi of the parents of Noah Posner, one of 26 gunned down in Connecticut.

Rabbi Shaul Praver of Congregation Adath Israel, told MSNBC that six-year-old Noah "was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and his little body could not endure so many bullets like that."

Noah’s mother Veronique, a nurse, fell apart emotionally after hearing the bitter news.

The rabbi told worshippers at Sabbath prayer services the following day, “Don’t think that life is somewhere over the rainbow. What you’ve got right now, with your family, your friends, your house: This might be as good as life is ever going to be.

"So hug your children, love your children… Life is not happening on the other side of the rainbow. We are on the other side of the rainbow.”

One friend of the Posner family told the Boston Herald that Noah’s mother “saw things she should never, ever have seen… Her son Noah should never have left the Earth.”

One area resident, who attended the Sandy Hook elementary school where Adam Lanza massacred his victims, told the newspaper, “I kept having memories of running around the playground and the soccer field. Going to class with our teachers, being little kids… and then watching on TV yesterday, seeing the FBI running through that soccer field.”

Rabbi Praver advised his congregation not to back away from facing reality. “We need to walk back into that school and as soon as the doors open up and go right back to school and continue on with our lives,” he said.

The Herald said that after prayer services, the rabbi told reporters, “I don’t buy the notion that only violence sells. Violence sells because someone chose to sell that product,” meaning violent video games and movies. “We can sell the product of peace.”