Daily Israel Report

Report: New Activity at Syrian Chemical Weapon Sites

There are signs of new activity at Syrian chemical weapons sites, Western intelligence officials said, according to The New York Times.
By Chana Ya'ar
First Publish: 12/2/2012, 1:06 PM

Along the Syrian-Turkish border
Along the Syrian-Turkish border
Reuters

There are signs of new activity at Syrian chemical weapons sites, Western intelligence officials said, according to The New York Times.

The report, published Saturday, quoted a U.S. intelligence official as saying the regime of President Bashar al-Assad is “doing some things that suggest they intend to use the weapons.

“It's not just moving stuff around,” he explained. “These are a different kind of activities.”

It is possible Syrian Army forces are preparing to use the weapons in a last-ditch effort to save the government, officials told the paper. However, it is also possible they are simply warning to Western nations about the implications of providing assistance to rebel forces, they added.

Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has said repeatedly that he will not allow an existential risk to the Jewish State. This past summer, Netanyahu said during an interview on the U.S.-based television program “Fox News Sunday” that it is essential to prevent Syrian weapons from falling into the wrong hands.

One major concern is the possibility that part of the Syrian arsenal may be transferred to Lebanon. "Could you imagine Hizbullah – the people are conducting with Iran all these terror attacks around the world – could you imagine them having chemical weapons?” he asked the interviewer.

"It would be like Al Qaeda having chemical weapons,” he continued. “It's something that is not acceptable to us, not acceptable to the United States and to any peaceable country in the world.

"So I think that this is something we'll have to act to stop if the need arises,” he said. “And the need might arise if there's a regime collapse, but not a regime change.”

Syria's arsenal, he added, is a common concern. “We'd have to see if there was a common action to address that concern,” he said.