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Ex-High Court Judge: Attacking Iran Dangerous to Israel

Former High Court Judge Winograd is the latest public figure to pontificate on Iran. “An attack would “risk Israel’s future,” says.
By Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
First Publish: 9/2/2012, 11:03 AM

Justice Winograd
Justice Winograd
Israel news photo: Flash 90

Former High Court Judge Eliyahu Winograd, who headed the government inquiry into the conduct of the Second Lebanon War, warned on Sunday that an Israeli attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities would “risk Israel’s future.”

Adding his voice to what has become a daily debate over whether or not Israel should strike Iran, Winograd publicly criticized Defense Minister Ehud Barak in an Army Radio interview, pointing out that “the heads of the entire defense establishment – Israel Security Agency (Shin Bet) and former and current Mossad chiefs – all oppose a strike, but Prime Minister Binyamin] Netanyahu and Barak will decide by themselves?”

He charged that their recent statements “are extremely irresponsible."

Winograd, who does not hold a defense or military position, maintained that economic sanctions against Iran are working and that Israel should wait for the United States to launch a joint strike.

He warned that If Israel attacks, the country will face a bombardment by both Iran and Hizbullah from the north and Hamas from the south. “We can look forward to missiles raining from all directions,” he added.

The retired judge questioned Israel’s preparedness for a counter-attack and mocked Barak’s claim that no more than 500 people would be killed in a war.

“How do you know? Did you already count?” Winograd asked sarcastically.

As for the Prime Minister, Winograd said that if he is planning a military attack, he is talking too much. “Sit down, shut up and plan it quietly. If you're planning a strike – strike, but why talk about it? So that the Iranians can be better prepared?" he said.

Political observers have suggested that Prime Minister Netanyahu has one public over Iran in order to make it an issue in the U.S. presidential election campaign.