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      Jihadist Tells Iran, Uprising in Jordan Can Help Crush Israel

      An Islamic Jihad official tells Iran that a popular uprising in Jordan would break the last part of Israel's "security chain."
      By Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
      First Publish: 8/12/2012, 3:35 PM

      Soldiers patrol Jordanian border
      Soldiers patrol Jordanian border
      Israel news photo: IDF spokesmen

      An Islamic Jihad official told Iran that a popular uprising in Jordan would break the last part of Israel's security chain."

      Abu Sharif stressed that the recent popular uprisings in the region have harmed the interests of Israel, according to the Iran’s controlled Fars News Agency.

      "These developments (popular uprisings) in the region are in the interest of the regional nations and against the interests of the Zionist regime and have disturbed the power balance between the supporters and opponents of the Zionist regime," Abu Sharif said.

      He cited the Islamic Revolution in Iran in 1979 as the first of several events "inflicted great damage on Israel." Abu Sharif continued, “The deterioration of relations between Turkey and Israel was the second blow at the regime and Mubarak's fall in Egypt was another blow.

      "If the regional changes reach Jordan, the Israeli regime will lose the last part of its security chain."

      Jordan and Egypt are Israel’s only neighbors with whom diplomatic relations have been established.

      The 1979 treaty with Egypt has survived frigid relations in the latter part of Mubarak’s regime, and the Muslim Brotherhood victories in the Egyptian legislative and presidential elections have left the treaty in questionable terms. Egypt is not about to break it, if for no other reason than its economic value and because of political pressure from the United States, which is a major source of foreign aid to Cairo.

      However, the terms of the treaty, particularly the extent of armed Egyptian soldiers in the terrorist-infested Sinai Peninsula, may be challenged by the new regime.

      Relations with Jordan have been less noisy, but the majority of non-Jordanian Arabs, descendants from families who fled Israel in previous wars, have created a demographic and political time bomb for King Abdullah II.

      To the north, Hizbullah controls southern Lebanon and Syria is engulfed n an all-out civil war. To the south, Israel faces Hamas terrorists in Gaza, and cells of Bedouin, Hamas and  Al Qaeda–linked terrorists in the Sinai.

      The jihadists see an uprising in Jordan as leaving Israel surrounded by stated enemies with a common principle of annihilating Israel.