Daily Israel Report

Outgoing Egyptian Ambassador: Peace Agreement is Strong

Egypt's outgoing ambassador to Israel, Yasser Ridah, says his country’s peace agreement with Israel is strong and sturdy.
By Elad Benari
First Publish: 7/11/2012, 5:14 AM

Ambassador Ridah with President Shimon Peres
Ambassador Ridah with President Shimon Peres
Flash 90

Egypt's outgoing ambassador to Israel, Yasser Ridah, said on Tuesday that his country’s peace agreement with Israel is strong and sturdy and will be able to withstand the upheavals in the Middle East.

Speaking at a special dinner in his honor in Jerusalem, Ridah said, according to Kol Yisrael radio, “The peace agreement has proven itself for many years.”

The ambassador added that the relations between Egypt and Israel in the economy and culture areas should be developed. He also said that a solution to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Authority would also affect positively the relations between Jerusalem and Cairo.

Kol Yisrael reported that the dinner in Ridah’s honor was attended by the heads of the Foreign Ministry. Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon said that Israel thanks Ridah for his unique contribution, adding that he is sure the outgoing ambassador will continue to be a true partner in promoting the ties between Israel and Egypt.

Ridah, who leaves his position after four years of service, will soon be replaced with Atef Suleiman, who was the Egyptian consul in Eilat.

Israel has been concerned over the future of the peace treaty with Egypt, after the Muslim Brotherhood extreme Islamist group clinched the parliamentary and presidential in the country.

The Muslim Brotherhood has threatened to re-examine the peace agreement which was signed by former Prime Minister Menachem Begin and former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in 1979.

After the election of the country’s Muslim Brotherhood president, Mohammed Morsi, the Iranian-based Fars news agency published an interview with him, in which he said he will "reconsider the Camp David Accord" with Israel.

Morsi subsequently denied he gave the interview, and his spokesman later said the new president plans to take legal action against Fars for fabricating the interview with him.

In a speech he made shortly after he was declared the winner of the elections, Morsi vowed to “respect all international agreements,” presumably meaning the pact with Israel, though he did not mention Israel by name.