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      Gush Katif Children's Video: My Lost Home

      Children from Gush Katif star in a new children's movie that teaches about the Israeli communities of Gaza destroyed in August 2005.
      By Chana Ya'ar
      First Publish: 5/30/2012, 1:05 PM

      Gush Katif evictees, 2010
      Gush Katif evictees, 2010
      Flash 90

      Children from Gush Katif star in a new children's movie that teaches about the Israeli communities of Gaza destroyed in August 2005. The film, created by the Katif Center in Nitzan, includes a number of songs by Ariella Savir.

      "This video is a symbol of great faith,” affirms Rabbi Yigal Kaminetsky, who was a leading rabbi in the now-destroyed Gush Katif region.

      "We continue to have faith. Difficulty is something we need to struggle with. Difficulty is a test, and its purpose is to lift man higher... We can see the settlements of Gush Katif residents throughout the region, and this is a bright side,” he added.

      The first Jewish settlement in the region of Gush Katif actually took place during the time of the Hasmoneans, as one learns when visiting the National Gush Katif Heritage Center in Nitzan.

      The museum was founded to tell the story of Jewish settlement in Gaza and its history up to the time of the expulsion of Jews from Gush Katif and northern Samaria. It is recommended for children older than age seven.

      This year marks the seventh since the residents of Gush Katif were forced from their businesses and homes. Many were given compensation payments for their homes, but were left jobless and with their things in storage for years at a time. Moreover, they were forced to continue paying mortgages on homes that were destroyed, as well as having to pay for typical day-to-day expenses such as food, school supplies and other necessities of life.

      It took years for the expellees to receive the money with which they were to rebuild their lives. When it was received, it was spent on survival; most were jobless for years, and still had no new permanent homes.